Welcome to the Cognitive Engineering Center

The Cognitive Engineering Center (CEC) was founded in 2005 by Dr. Amy Pritchett and is based in the College of Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Cognitive engineering focuses on the analysis, design, and evaluation of complex socio-technical systems of people and technology such as air/ground transportation and military systems. It combines knowledge and experience from the cognitive and computer sciences, human factors, human-computer interaction, and systems engineering. Human cognitive activities such as planning, decision making, and problem solving, should be considered early in the systems design process of technology, procedures, or teams. The goals of the field are to provide better integration between human operators and the system so that human operators can act more effectively and preserve system safety and productivity if unanticipated situations arise; and to consider capabilities and limitations of human cognitive behaviors in the design processes of the system to reduce potential human errors and maximize human performance

Researchers within the CEC examine human-system integration in complex work environments from theoretical and methodological viewpoints, in the field and in the laboratory, and make substantive contributions to practice. Its research and education efforts span several domains of engineering, most notably: 

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Educational Technology Research
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

NASA Early Stage Innovation Grant to Boost Prof. Feigh's Research

JAN 9, 2017 - CEC professors, Dr. Karen Feigh and Dr. Amy Pritchett, recently received a two year, $600K NASA Early Stage Innovation (ESI) grant for "Technologies for Mixed-Initiative Plan Management for Human Space Flight." Their goal is to develop technology that will allow on-board astronauts to develop their own short- and long-term plans for accomplishing mission objectives. 

Canellas and Feigh introduce new heuristic rules for information acquisition and restriction

DEC 30, 2016 - What information should be presented to or hidden from decision makers in order to facilitate high performance in decision tasks? In a recently accepted article to IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems, "Heuristic Information Acquisition and Restriction for Decision Support," CEC researchers, Marc Canellas and Karen Feigh, contribute new rules for information acquisition and restriction which do not require reliable assessments of probabilities, cue weights, and cue values, as most normative, Bayesian methods do. 

A CEC field trip to Flight Safety International's Atlanta Learning Center

DEC 21, 2016 - The CEC graduate students took a trip to Flight Safety International Inc. this week to learn how general and commercial aviation pilots train. They were introduced to the same type of classroom training, flight training devices, and simulators that pilots use. At the conclusion of the trip, the students had the opportunity to pilot the simulators from take-off through landing at night and in fog.

What can regulators learn from cognitive engineering? CEC researchers will try to answer

DEC 15, 2016 – What can regulators of human-autonomous systems learn from the literature of cognitive engineering? Five CEC researchers, Marc CanellasRachel HagaMatthew MillerYosef Razin, and Dev Minotra, will try to answer this question with their paper, “An Engineer’s Cheat-Sheet for Regulators of Human-Autonomous Systems.” The paper was among the 10% of abstracts accepted to WeRobot 2017, the premier robot law conference in the country, to be held at Yale Law School, one of the top law schools in the U.S. and the world. Their paper builds off two previous articles by Canellas and Haga (2015; 2016) by addressing five major concerns of regulating human-autonomous systems: definitions, complexity, safety, transparency, and accountability.

Canellas presents methods of representing human behavior at Military Operations Research Society (MORS) conference

DEC 11, 2016 – When Marc Canellas, CEC PhD candidate, looked out on the audience at his most recent presentation, he didn’t see the typical aerospace engineers or psychologists. There were Marine and Navy officers, wargaming and cybersecurity analysts for the Army and Navy, and consultants from small and large aerospace and defense firms. These were the standard members of the Military Operations Research Society (MORS), the society for active military analysts, researchers, consultants, and officers within the U.S. Department of Defense focused on operations research and decision sciences. Marc had been invited to present at the first-ever MORS Emerging Techniques Special Meeting (METSM).

Miller tests prototype software during NASA BASALT mission in Hawaii

DEC 10, 2016 - Matthew Miller, a CEC Ph.D. candidate, ended the Fall 2016 semester by spending 3 weeks in November conducting simulated Mars surface operations on the Big Island of Hawaii. Miller is a member of the extravehicular activity (EVA) operations research team for the NASA Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains (BASALT) research program. In this capacity, he serves as an EVA flight controller and concept of operations developer for future human Mars exploration campaigns.

Krening IML paper included in Prof. Hal Daume's blog

DEC 9, 2016 - Professor Hal Daume of of the University of Maryland used Sam Krening's recent article on her work in Interactive Machine Learning as an example of interesting new ways that Natural Language can be used in Machine learning.

http://nlpers.blogspot.com/2016/12/whence-your-reward-function.html

Dr. Feigh named Associate Fellow by AIAA

OCT 24, 2016: Dr. Karen Feigh of the Cognitive Engineering Center has been elected as an Associate Fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the largest and most influential aerospace engineering society.

Matthew Miller selected as a GVU Foley Scholar Finalist

Miller was selected as a GVU Center Foley Scholars Finalists for 2016 from a talented and diverse group of applicants representing research programs from across Georgia Tech. Finalists were selected for their research vision and the potential impact of their work. The Foley Scholarship includes a $5,000 award and gives students more visibility for their research and potential new collaborative opportunities. Now in its ninth year, the scholarship is supported by donor gifts to the James D. Foley GVU Center Endowment. The endowment was started in honor of James D. Foley, a professor of Interactive Computing, pioneer in the field of Human-Computer Interaction, and a continuing influence in the lives and research of students and faculty in the GVU Center.

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Cognitive Engineering Center (CEC)
Georgia Institute of Technology
270 Ferst Drive
Atlanta GA 30332-0150